The Harrigan’s Promo Video

‘Mr. Harrigan’s Phone’ gets its message across with a smart Stephen King adaptation from two of New York’s best This post was originally published on the TheWrap.com. Follow WIRED Opinion on Twitter for more….

The Harrigan's Promo Video

‘Mr. Harrigan’s Phone’ gets its message across with a smart Stephen King adaptation from two of New York’s best

This post was originally published on the TheWrap.com. Follow WIRED Opinion on Twitter for more.

At one time, Mr. Harrigan’s was a very fancy department store, and if you were lucky you would come across it on the subway, on your way to work in New York City on a weekday morning. The store’s a bit of a mystery, but if you happen to pass by it on the way to the West Village, you might be able to spot the door where the owner, David R. Harrigan, used to check out his customers and make them feel welcome. In his day, there were at least four elevators (all of them were gold) and they each took up to thirty people at a time. That’s a lot to have going on in one of the top floors of a department store.

The store is long gone, but the memories it left behind can still be found in TheHARRIGN’S.com, an online archive of the store’s promotional video. It’s a smart show for two reasons. One, it’s a chance to see a little bit about how the Harrigan’s of old got its start, and the second is that it’s a chance to see one of New York’s best video creators, Sean McCollum, play one of the most iconic characters of the modern era, Mr. Harrigan, and tell the story of his death through his eyes.

The original video was shot by Jim McBride, who directed the film adaptation of the Stephen King novel that starred Jim Carrey. The video was actually shot for a different book, but it looked pretty much like a King homage, so they set it aside. It was then rediscovered by McCollum in 2008 and he shot TheHARRIGN’S.com, and today you can watch it.

McCollum has been in the video business for a long time. He was one of the first to shoot full-blown video commercials for McDonalds, KFC, Pepsi and other corporate giants. He was involved with the production and design of

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