Six Things to Know About Los Angeles City Council Elections

Guerrero: L.A. needs a new generation of Latino leaders LOS ANGELES — The latest round of Los Angeles City Council elections is drawing national attention for two reasons: The candidates represent the most diverse…

Six Things to Know About Los Angeles City Council Elections

Guerrero: L.A. needs a new generation of Latino leaders

LOS ANGELES — The latest round of Los Angeles City Council elections is drawing national attention for two reasons: The candidates represent the most diverse city council in history and the two largest Hispanic groups in the United States are poised to make history in November.

The council is comprised of two Hispanic-majority groups: Latinos and gays/lesbians. Latinos account for 20.5 percent of the city’s population. But they make up 32.5 percent of the council, which means that they will make up more than half of the new council when it comes up for elections in November.

The council is also a gay-majority group and the largest gay group in the country.

The election is an important moment for Los Angeles. It is, however, a watershed moment for Latinos and gays/lesbians.

Hispanic candidates who are running will begin to earn a following, and perhaps even a seat on the council. And, regardless of the outcome, gays and lesbians will have the added responsibility of running the city, an important change for gay people in the United States.

Here are six things to know about the race for Los Angeles City Council:

1) They’re not running for the same position: In May, two Latino candidates for city council were the only four candidates on the ballot in the city. Now it’s a majority of two Hispanic candidates.

And, of the four candidates, one represents the fastest-growing Latino segment of the city. Another represents a large LGBT group. In short, there’s diversity in both races, but they aren’t running for the same position.

2) The race for the Latino seat is interesting: The Latino candidate, Councilwoman Janice Hahn, is a newcomer to office who has been on the council since 1993. Hahn was elected to the council in a non-partisan race in 1992. She’s

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