Mayor Willie Brown and Police Chief Reiley are best-positioned to bring crime victims and criminals together

Bass and Caruso differ on crime issues and policing — but not as much as many think Both Mayor Willie Brown and Police Chief Edward Reiley agree on crime, but they differ on other…

Mayor Willie Brown and Police Chief Reiley are best-positioned to bring crime victims and criminals together

Bass and Caruso differ on crime issues and policing — but not as much as many think

Both Mayor Willie Brown and Police Chief Edward Reiley agree on crime, but they differ on other issues, including the Police Review Commission and the Department of Public Safety.

According to an online survey conducted by the California Citizen’s Institute, Brown — who was re-elected on Tuesday night, defeating former Councilman Bill Bogaard — is best-positioned to bring some of the city’s crime victims and criminals together.

Brown has brought former Councilman Carl DeMaio to his council table (DeMaio’s son, Kevin, is now on the city payroll, and has since resigned his council seat) and also promised to convene a community task force to discuss crime.

DeMaio is one of two candidates who received the most votes in the March 10 City Council election — but he was only able to garner enough support to receive the five votes needed to make the runoff.

Brown received 1,818 votes, while DeMaio took 1,500. City Councilman Pauline Newman, who was backed by the police union and supported by Police Chief Reiley, received 1,094 votes.

Caruso defeated Newman, who is running as a Write Ballot candidate as an alternative to Brown’s choice of DeMaio, by receiving 1,040 votes. Newman — who was the only one of the four city council candidates who came under attack from the Police Review Commission, which is currently operating under a lawsuit filed against the commission by Brown — is now a Write Ballot candidate, hoping that voters’ concerns about the police commission will cause voters to vote it out of office.

The Citizen’s Institute survey found that 65 percent of the respondents believe the Police Review Commission process is biased toward the police. Among the top issues that respondents listed as a “very important” concern was whether the commission is “an impartial, independent review process,” with

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