Los Angeles — A former UCLA basketball player sentenced to two years in prison for cheating on admissions exams

Beverly Hills real estate mogul sentenced in college admissions scandal dies by suicide in California The judge said his sentencing of a member of the wealthy college admissions scandal family to up to 13…

Los Angeles — A former UCLA basketball player sentenced to two years in prison for cheating on admissions exams

Beverly Hills real estate mogul sentenced in college admissions scandal dies by suicide in California The judge said his sentencing of a member of the wealthy college admissions scandal family to up to 13 years was appropriate given the crime.

— – The widow of the former chairman of the University of Southern California’s admissions office was sentenced Monday in federal court in Los Angeles to two years in prison for running an elaborate scheme to cheat on the school’s admissions exams, and two other people were also sentenced, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said.

She was also sentenced to four years of supervised release after her release from prison.

Beverly Hills real estate mogul parents, parents-in-law of UCLA basketball star Lonzo Ball, and a third person, a former UCLA basketball player, were also charged by federal prosecutors for their roles in the scheme, which involved taking bribes in exchange for allowing their children to attend the school.

They were also charged with making false statements to a federal investigator and for using a fake id.

The parents were charged with conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud and conspiracy to commit money laundering.

The man and woman, along with the alleged mastermind, all face a maximum sentence of 25 years in federal prison.

The three were charged under the Economic Espionage Act for allegedly trying to sell the information about the test cheating scheme to others, including parents of the basketball player.

“The parents and Lonzo were the ones that allegedly set everything in motion… It is the parents who came up with the idea to cheat on their children’s admissions exams, and their idea was to sell the information to other parents,” U.S. Attorney Nick Hanna said in a statement. “That is when they began to use the children as pawns in a fraud scheme that left three of them falsely accused of cheating.”

All three of the defendants pleaded guilty.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office said the parents, who were married and lived near Los Angeles, began conspiring with the man and woman in early 2010.

The woman, who was described by the U.S. Attorney’s Office as a businesswoman, created a fake company that would be used to administer the college entrance exams, according to court documents.

The man, who lived in California

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