K-9 Kyle was shot and killed in Jackson County

Veterinarian contradicts Sheriff’s Department account of K-9 death A video released from the veterinarian who has taken custody of the dogs involved in the K-9 death that sparked the investigation shows no sign of…

K-9 Kyle was shot and killed in Jackson County

Veterinarian contradicts Sheriff’s Department account of K-9 death

A video released from the veterinarian who has taken custody of the dogs involved in the K-9 death that sparked the investigation shows no sign of abuse or neglect.

The video, dated from 2:25 to 3:55 p.m. on October 6, 2011, shows Dr. Chris McCord, a licensed veterinarian from the area serving as temporary veterinarian for Jackson County Sheriff’s Department deputies, speaking with sheriff’s deputies with the assistance of Jackson County jail veterinarians.

The video, shot from the window of a van, shows McCord in his office at Jackson County’s Dr. James Hunter Animal Hospital and holding two of the dogs.

Deputies said they were told of the dogs’ death and were asked to assist with the investigation.

Sheriff Tom Cross said deputies arrived at Hunter, his veterinarian practice at the time, at approximately 4:30 p.m. to help with the investigation.

The veterinary team, which also included the county’s inspector-colleagues, determined that K-9 K-9 Kyle, an American Staffordshire Terrier, was shot and killed after being chased by a man who also shot another dog in the same neighborhood.

Deputies then received a call from medical professionals who informed them that the K-9, K-9 Kyle, was dead.

McCord did not appear to be in a hurry or agitated by the news.

When asked by Cross why another dog would have to take K-9 Kyle’s place as K-9 K-9 Kim took K-9 Kyle’s place, McCord said he had a “great deal of interest” in the second dog and was looking forward to seeing him.

McCook, the veterinarian for the sheriff’s office, told McCord that he believed that the K-9s were abused and neglected and recommended that the department take custody of all dogs involved.

McCook also said that the K-9 dogs should be given space to live while they are examined, vaccinated and prepared for adoption.

McCord and his staff said they would take care of the dogs, but that some did not have home to go to, and that he asked his staff to return the dogs to the veterinary office.

They said they had space for the K-9s but could not keep them.

Deputies later

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