Forecasters expect a third-year La Nia to return to California around 2018-19

A rare third year of La Niña is on deck for California, forecasters say Forecasters expect a third-year La Niña to return to California around 2018-19. But they said they still don’t know what…

Forecasters expect a third-year La Nia to return to California around 2018-19

A rare third year of La Niña is on deck for California, forecasters say

Forecasters expect a third-year La Niña to return to California around 2018-19. But they said they still don’t know what the weather will be like for the rest of the decade.

Forecasters said they still don’t know what the weather will be like for the rest of the decade. But they said they still don’t know what the weather will be like for the rest of the decade.

Forecasters said they still don’t know what the weather will be like for the rest of the decade. But they said they still don’t know what the weather will be like for the rest of the decade.

Forecasters said they still don’t know what the weather will be like for the rest of the decade.

The third year of La Niña will be a “very unusual” event in the Southern California area, including Los Angeles and San Diego, where temperatures will remain cooler than normal through the end of the year, according to the National Centers for Environmental Prediction.

“This third year of La Niña is going to bring a very unusual event to California,” said Jim Steenburgh, an atmospheric scientist at the center who was not part of the team that predicted the year’s heat.

More good news…

“The good news is that the La Niña event will probably be a very deep event, and so it’ll probably result in more of the surface cooling,” he said during an interview at the center’s headquarters in Boulder, Colorado. “So, the good news is, it’ll definitely result in less warming and more cooling than we might otherwise get.”

Last year, forecasters said a similar thing for the Los Angeles region, with the third year of La Niña bringing cooler temperatures in the past three months.

The Southern California third-year event is unlike other La Niña events, which last from three to four years, the center’s Steenburgh said

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